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US-VISIT Redress Policy

US-VISIT has in place a three-stage process for people to inquire about the data US-VISIT has collected on them as well as to facilitate the amendment or correction of data that are not accurate, relevant, timely, or complete.

  • Stage 1 occurs at the primary inspection lane and provides data correction on the spot for the vast majority of errors discovered. The Customs and Border Protection Officer has the ability to manually correct your name, DOB, flight information, and country-specific document number and document type errors. For biometric types of data errors (mismatches), the officer sends a data correction request to US-VISIT.
  • Stage 2 is for anyone who was processed through US-VISIT who would like to have his or her records reviewed for accuracy, relevancy, timeliness, or completeness. The US-VISIT Privacy Officer will use the information to verify the identity of the requestor to ensure privacy protection and then process the request as quickly as possible.  
  • Stage 3, available to people not satisfied with the result of the records review, can appeal to the DHS Privacy Officer, who will review the case and provide final adjudication on the matter.

How to Submit a Redress Request to US-VISIT

When you arrive in the United States, if you went through US-VISIT processing -- your fingers were scanned and your photo taken -- you may request that the US-VISIT Privacy Officer review your records for the purpose of amending or correcting them based on questions concerning accuracy, relevancy, timeliness, or completeness.  

The Information You Need to Provide for Your Request to be Processed

  1. Submit a letter that states why you believe that your record is not accurate, relevant, timely, or complete, and specify the amendment or correction that you want. You are encouraged to submit copies of any documentation that you think would be helpful to process your request.
  2. Your letter must also provide the following information to verify your identity and to properly process your request:
  • Full name as listed in your passport and/or visa
  • Mailing address
  • Contact telephone number (this is optional, but may facilitate follow-up if additional information is needed to process your request)
  • Date and place of birth
  • Date of arrival and/or departure from U.S.
  • U.S. port of arrival and/or departure
  • Name of airline or sea vessel (this is optional, but may facilitate the processing of your request)
  • Airline flight # or cruise line ticket #
  • Passport # and country of issuance
  • U.S. visa #

You must sign your request and your signature must either be notarized or submitted by you under 28 U.S.C 1746, a law that permits statements to be made under penalty of perjury as a substitute for notarization.

For your convenience you can use the following form:

Where to Submit Your Redress

Your redress should be sent to:

US-VISIT Privacy Officer

US-VISIT
U.S. Department of Homeland Security
Washington, D.C. 20528, USA  

In addition, the Privacy Officer can be reached for questions at 202-298-5200.

When You Will Receive a Response?

We make every effort to respond in a timely manner.  We expect the process will take twenty (20) business days, but the volume of requests may result in our not being able to meet this goal.  Please note that incoming mail to the Department of Homeland Security is subject to frequent security delays.

What If the Response is not Satisfactory?

If you are not satisfied with the response you receive from US-VISIT, you can appeal your case to the Department of Homeland Security Chief Privacy Officer, who will review your appeal, and provide final adjudication on the matter.  

The Department of Homeland Security Chief Privacy Officer can be contacted at:

Chief Privacy Officer

ATTN: US-VISIT Appeal
Department of Homeland Security
Washington, D.C.  20528 USA
Fax: 202-772-5036

 

Last Published Date: December 10, 2012
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