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National Strategy for Maritime Security

The Maritime Commerce Security Plan is one of eight plans  developed in support of the National Strategy for Maritime Security, as directed by National Security Presidential Directive-41/Homeland Security Presidential Directive-13. In addition to drawing on the expertise of federal agencies, this Plan also reflects the insight and concerns of public and private stakeholders. It was also coordinated with the other supporting plans throughout its development, especially the Maritime Transportation System Security Plan and the Maritime Infrastructure Recovery Plan because of their importance to the secure flow of commerce.

Maritime Infrastructure Recovery Plan

The Maritime Infrastructure Recovery Plan (MIRP) is one of eight plans supporting the National Strategy for Maritime Security. It was developed in collaboration with public- and private-sector stakeholders, as directed by National Security Presidential Directive-41/Homeland Security Presidential Directive-13. Its development was also coordinated with other supporting plans, especially the Maritime Transportation System Security Recommendations and the Maritime Commerce Security Plan because of their importance to the secure flow of commerce.

What the MIRP is:

  • The MIRP is intended to protect the American economy by facilitating the restoration of passenger and cargo flow, specifically container cargo, in the event of an attack or similarly disruptive event. Container cargo is more likely to hold perishable items in immediate need of unloading, or items that are key components in the production of consumer goods.
  • The MIRP includes an exercise plan to maintain a level of preparedness within maritime community. This plan recommends periodic table-top and field exercises, which align with existing related plans such as the National Response Plan and the Top Official program.

What the MIRP is not:

  • The MIRP does not address long-term interruptions for conveyances that carry primarily non-perishable cargo. In addition, certain commodities, such as liquefied natural gas and oil offer very limited options for cargo diversion, as there are just four LNG ports, and oil refineries are already operating at 97 percent capacity.
  • The MIRP is not a plan for the physical recovery of a port that has been impacted by a natural or man-made incident. Rather, the MIRP protects the economy by providing guidance for redirecting container cargo traffic away from the impacted port to an appropriate alternate port.

Maritime Transportation System Security Recommendations

The Maritime Transportation System Security Recommendations is one of eight plans developed in support of the National Strategy for Maritime Security, as directed by National Security Presidential Directive-41/Homeland Security Presidential Directive-13.  In addition to drawing on the expertise of federal agencies represented in the Maritime Transportation System Security working group, this plan also reflects the insight and concerns of a wide array of public and private stakeholders.The Recommendations’ primary goal is to improve the security of the maritime transportation system, while preserving its functionality and efficiency.

National Plan to Achieve Maritime Domain Awareness

The National Plan to Achieve Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA) outlines the national priorities for achieving maritime domain awareness, drawing on the insights and expertise of a range of federal agencies and departments that came together to create this plan. It includes near-term and long-term objectives, required program and resource implications, and recommendations for organizational or policy changes. It is one of eight plans developed in support of the National Strategy for Maritime Security, as directed by National Security Presidential Directive-41/Homeland Security Presidential Directive-13.

The Domestic Outreach Plan is one of eight plans developed to support the National Strategy for Maritime Security, as directed by National Security Presidential Directive-41/Homeland Security Presidential Directive-13.

Engaging the U.S. Maritime Community and its Partners in Maritime Security Efforts

During the development phase, domestic outreach activities focused on gaining insights into the needs and concerns of maritime stakeholders to help three other working groups  develop their plans. Additionally, the Domestic Outreach Plan provides guidance for educating stakeholders about the Strategy and its supporting plans during implementation.

  • Maritime stakeholder feedback was crucial in ensuring that non-federal interests were addressed in the supporting plans. Domestic Outreach objectives relied heavily on coordination with a variety of public- and private-sector partners to identify and engage appropriate maritime stakeholders during each phase of outreach.
  • Early outreach sought to gain fair, representative feedback on behalf of the broad range of individual stakeholders who have an interest in maritime security. During the development phase, outreach focused on key individuals and organizations representing the interests of hundreds of thousands of maritime stakeholders. Targeted activities, such as focus groups, made it possible for other working groups to gain fair, representative input from the private sector, the maritime industry, and state/local/tribal/ territorial governments.
  • Strong collaboration will continue to support outreach efforts. Present activities build on lessons learned through previous, related efforts, such as outreach conducted in association with HSPDs 5, 7 and 8.

Recommendations

  • Stakeholder Education. The Domestic Outreach Plan provides guidance for educating the public and private sectors about the National Strategy for Maritime Security and its supporting plans, as they are implemented.
  • Interagency Coordinating Committee for Outreach. The Plan also recommends establishing an Interagency Coordinating Committee for Outreach (ICCO). This Committee will provide strong interagency collaboration and coordination on all outreach activities as the Strategy and its plans are implemented.
Last Published Date: July 16, 2015
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