U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Government Website

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Safely connect using HTTPS

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock () or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Breadcrumb

  1. Home
  2. Topics
  3. Science and Technology
  4. News & Events
  5. S&T 2022 Year in Review

S&T 2022 Year in Review

Image
2022 Year in Review
(Image: S&T)

2022 was another busy year for the Science and Technology Directorate (S&T). We executed research and development with significant, tangible impacts; funded innovation through strategic partnerships; fostered creative solutions by hosting special events and challenges; contributed vital knowledge products with far-reaching benefits; and evolved as an organization with bold new initiatives. We did this all while welcoming new leadership that will usher S&T into its 20th Anniversary in 2023. With even brighter things on the horizon, here is a look at some of our top accomplishments this year, along with some lessons learned along the way. 

Image
We’re getting by with a little help from our friends…in other words, collaboration is where it’s at.
(Image: S&T)
Image
A man dressed in white Tyvek protective overalls with a hood wears a breathing mask. He is spraying the wall of the 4-5th floor of a tall grayish building while standing on raised vehicle platform in the background of a blue sky. "This project and demonstration helped us learn the procedures we'll need to follow and will prepare us to respond to biological incidents involving anthrax and other pathogens.
(Image: S&T)

Culminated a 4-year effort called Analysis for Coastal Operational Resiliency, or AnCOR, which will help prepare for a variety of potential biohazard emergencies—from naturally occurring disease outbreaks to an accidental or intentional release of a bioagent. The targeted field assessments were a joint project with the Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and included a study that traced the path of pathogens after rain.

Image
Bull head in pot with a detection device
(Image: S&T)

Hosted more than 200 participants at JamX 22, an exercise to counter electronic jamming, at White Sands Missile Range. In addition to assessing current tools and technologies available to identify, locate, and mitigate spectrum interference, the event also assesses the effectiveness of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA)’s new Resilient Communications Training, which is now available. “We’ve immediately raised the bar of preparedness,” said Billy Bob Brown, Jr., CISA Emergency Communications Executive Assistant Director. 

Image
Evaluators confer with each other while standing behind a New York Metropolitan subway car within a subway tunnel.
(Photo: S&T)

National Urban Security Technology Laboratory (NUSTL) hosted Urban OpEx 2022 to evaluate new and emerging technology solutions in realistic, urban settings throughout the New York Metropolitan area. More than 150 participants attended the event to test a variety of leading edge technologies including handheld sensors, unmanned aircraft systems, AI-enabled gun detection, incident management and situational awareness platforms, deployable communications and deployable robotics. 

Image
We're leveraging cutting-edge technology to fight (and win) the good fight.
(Image: S&T)
Image
Infographic depicting “To date, StreamView has led to 57 children rescued, 17 convictions, 38 arrests, 4 life sentences, and 98 leads and referrals.”
(Image: S&T)

Enabled the rescue of 23 trafficking victims and the arrest of three suspects thanks to advanced StreamView technology developed by S&T and Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) to fight online child sexual exploitation. The innovative software program allows agents to streamline their investigative process, aggregating and organizing the huge amount of unstructured data from legal warrant returns to generate and prioritize investigative leads, identify relationships, and build a cohesive case.

Image
Xoran’s 3D X-ray scanner stands in a room, on a tiled floor. Illuminated blue lights on top of the scanner indicate that it is ready for use. To the right of the scanner is a six-wheeled remote-controlled robotic truck with a crane-shaped arm, preparing to pick up the X-ray.
(Photo: Xoran Technologies, LLC)

Developed 3D X-Ray Scanner to enable quick, easy, and accurate security screening of luggage. This user-friendly, portable, multi-functional, and durable prototype imaging tool offers incredible adaptability in the field. The imaging tool uses a combination of both 2D and 3D computed tomography (CT) imaging capabilities to detect the presence of hidden explosive devices and related components in backpack-sized containers or bags—without needing to open them.

Image
A line of wildland firefighters wearing full firefighting gear, including yellow coats and white helmets, and carrying heavy axes, walks through a field accompanied by data collectors with clipboards. In the background, a green leafy forest surrounding the field.
(Photo: S&T)

Field tested a respirator designed to protect wildland firefighters from the smoke, ash, and toxic gases they face as they fight fires. “After the firefighters have performed each of the tasks, and everyone has given their feedback about how the system had performed, we'll return to NUSTL, and we’ll write the report with the data collectors,” said Hasan Shahid, NUSTL Test Engineer.

Image
“The WUI integration model will develop connected platforms capable of delivering lifesaving evacuation notifications and digital alerts.” – Antwane Johnson, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Integrated Public Alert & Warning System (IPAWS) Division Director
(Image: S&T)

Tested Next Generation Wildland Urban Interface Alerting Technology in Fairfax County, Virginia. The proof-of-concept model integrates with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Integrated Public Alert Warning System (IPAWS), enabling alerting authorities to disseminate vital hazard information on the "infotainment" screens in vehicles in a timely fashion.

Image
We’re finding new and innovative ways to tell S&T’s stories, and you’re responding.
(Image: S&T)
Image
DHS Under Secretary for Science and Technology, Dr. Dimitri Kusnezov, is seated at a table with a laptop and microphone, wearing large headphones while gesturing and smiling at someone on screen. In the background, the DHS flag.
(Photo: S&T)

Launched “Technologically Speaking”, the official S&T podcast, to tell the stories behind the science. Season one featured nine unscripted conversations (plus a very special bonus episode with our new Under Secretary, Dr. Dimitri Kusnezov) about timely national security challenges and the scientific solutions S&T is developing to tackle them. S&T subject matter experts spoke candidly about everything from bomb squads to biometrics. The award-winning series will be back with season two in early 2023, but mini episodes of “Tech Speak” are available now to tide listeners over until then.

Image
“Equipping our Everyday Heroes” exhibit at the National Atomic Testing Museum, which includes two firefighter mannequins, a glass display case with various devices on the shelves within, and a table and chairs in the foreground for visitors.
(Photo: S&T)

Opened new “Equipping our Everyday Heroes” exhibit at the National Atomic Testing Museum in Las Vegas. The interactive experience features a variety of capabilities developed to help first responders prepare for the unexpected, gear up to save lives, and share critical information during an incident. It also highlights various S&T initiatives furthering our collective scientific knowledge in pursuit of public safety.

Image
The museum welcomes an average of 94 people daily, meaning the exhibit has been seen by nearly 20,000 visitors since opening in April.
(Image: S&T)

 

Image
We’re growing the future homeland security workforce and fostering a new generation of trailblazers.
(Image: S&T)
Image
Four Criminal Investigations and Network Analysis Center/George Mason University students in matching t-shirts that say “Countering Emerging Threats toCritical Infrastructure,” sit on a blue-patterned couch as they pose for a photo.
(Photo: S&T)

Collaborated with the Center for Accelerating Operational Efficiency to hold third annual Grand Challenge Hackathon, an opportunity for students to take on real-world challenges and see if a career in homeland security science and engineering is right for them. The topics for 2022 were: detecting if an autonomous vehicle has been hijacked and preventing or responding to it, identifying the presence of illegal activity on open-source networks, and mitigating attacks on digital elements of our nation’s critical infrastructure. 

Image
Cooling Solutions Challenge: Grand Prize Winner: $50,000; Runner-Up Winner: $25,000; Four “Use-Case” Winners: $10,000 each; Honorable Mention: $5,000
(Image: S&T)

Announced winners of the Cooling Solutions Challenge prize competition, an effort to counter extreme heat, which is the nation’s leading cause of weather-related death. The Grand Prize Winner received $50,000 for a cooling system that uses a compressor-free/refrigerant-free technology to significantly reduce energy consumption and the associated carbon emissions.

Image
“35 students participated in H4HS” along with a screenshot from the event showing 20 participants’ faces on a video conference call.
(Photo: S&T)

Empowered students to take on real-world national security problems with the fourth Hacking for Homeland Security (H4HS) event at Carnegie Mellon University in the Spring and the fifth H4HS event in the fall at Rochester Institute of Technology and Texas A&M University. Student teams worked on a myriad of challenges, including improving the airport screening and security checkpoint process for the Transportation Security Administration, anticipating future disaster impacts and risks for FEMA, prioritizing multimedia incident information reported to 9-1-1 call centers for CISA, and efficiently processing application data for individuals seeking to be temporarily in the United States for HSI. 

Image
Awarded $300M in funding to support National Security Initiatives. Detection Canine R&D. CUAS/Drone/Mobile Emergency

Awarded ~$300M in funding to support national security initiatives across a variety of mission spaces. S&T sponsored small businesses’ security technology prototypes, Department of Defense counter-unmanned aircraft system threat efforts, an artificial intelligence-powered software system, Auburn University detection canine research and development, minority serving institutions’ summer research projects, and more.

Image
CIVIC Innovation Challenge – Powering smart & connected communities
(Image: S&T)

Awarded Stage 1 Planning Grants for the CIVIC Innovation Challenge, a multi-agency federal government research and action competition that aims to provide a scalable, sustainable, and transferable impact on community-identified priorities. A total of 56 teams each received $50,000 to support ready-to-implement, research-based pilot projects in one of two areas: living in a changing climate or resource and service equity.

Image
Participants in the 2022 Biometric Technology Rally line up in different cordoned-off sections to test facial recognition algorithms at the Maryland Test Facility.
(Photo: S&T)

Held fifth annual Biometric Technology Rally at the Maryland Test Facility, once again challenging industry to develop systems that meet the latest operational requirements. The 2022 event focused on the technical challenge of reliably identifying small, free-flowing groups of people opting-in to the process in crowded environments, like airports or ports of entry. Providers of face biometric acquisition systems and matching algorithms were encouraged to participate.

Image
50 representatives from across federal government, airline and airport trade associations, and partner nations attended the event.
(Image: S&T)

 

Image
We're thinking globally about security and working with our allies to find common solutions.
(Image: S&T)
Image
A group of officials are seen from behind standing up in the stands of the Capital One Arena in Washington, DC during a tour, looking down at a basketball court below.
(Photo: S&T)

Showcased in-building smart sensors for S&T’s Under Secretary, Dr. Dimitri Kusnezov and colleagues from Singapore, including Chan Tsan, Deputy Secretary (Development) at the Ministry of Home Affairs and Chief Executive of the Home Team Science and Technology Agency. The tour of Capital One Arena in Washington, DC—a major event venue that holds around 20,000 people—offered a glimpse at a successful testbed revolutionizing physical security. 

Image
United States and South Korean flags flapping together in the breeze with blue sky in the background.
(Photo: Envato)

Signed Agreement for Cybersecurity and Public Safety with South Korea. The Project Arrangement and Joint Statement of Intent is part of a Memorandum of Understanding between the two countries in the fields of science and technology. The relationship will provide a foundation for collaborative research, development, and foreign technical exchanges in cybersecurity and public safety solutions with the Republic of Korea’s Ministry of Science and Information Communication Technology.

Image
United States and Israeli flags flapping together in the breeze with blue sky in the background.
(Photo: Envato)

Initiated the Israel-U.S. Binational Industrial Research and Development (BIRD) Cyber program to enhance resilience of critical infrastructure. The BIRD Cyber call for proposals seeks cooperative projects leading to innovative technologies in particular areas of interest: secured architecture for protecting core operational processes, real-time risk assessment solutions for small-to-medium sized airports or seaports, resilience center pilots for small and medium sized businesses and enterprises, and advanced data fusion and analytics.

Image
We’re Wielding the Power of Knowledge for the Betterment of All
(Image: S&T)
Image
A shield graphic shows icons representing positioning, navigation, and timing with digital code and circuit board imagery in the background. It is from the cover of the “Resilient Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) Reference Architecture”.
(Image: S&T)

Published the Resilient Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) Reference Architecture to address current and future threats to this critical infrastructure system. “By applying cybersecurity principles like Zero Trust Architectures to PNT, we can design resilient PNT systems that can continue to function properly even under the assumption of compromise,” said Ernest Wong, S&T Technical Manager.

Image
A graphic shows the Earth from space along with infrastructure imagery such as a cell tower. It is from the cover of the “Electromagnetic Pulse Shielding Mitigations” report.
(Image: S&T)

Released a report of operational approaches to protect against electromagnetic pulse (EMP) and geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) events such as a solar wind shock wave or a nuclear explosion in Earth’s atmosphere. The document is a collaborative effort between S&T, FEMA IPAWS, and CISA to employ best practices currently used to shield the National Public Warning System from EMP and GMD interruption so critical infrastructure like the power grid can be made similarly resilient. 

Image
More than 30 teams from across the nation contributed hundreds of vital data points to help create a new training tool for explosive detection canines.
(Image: S&T)

Launched a new interactive training tool for handlers and trainers of explosive detection canines to upgrade their capabilities to Person-Borne Explosives Detection (PBED). The comprehensive guideline includes detailed descriptions of training techniques, video clips, and tips on evaluating canines for potential PBED detection capabilities. The training tool was developed in collaboration with the Johns Hopkins University-Applied Physics Laboratory.

Image
We're getting better and better
(Image: S&T)
Image
Dr. Dimitri Kusnezov is sworn in alongside his wife, Jacqueline, by DHS Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas.
(Photo: John Dargan, Systems Engineering & Standards Director)

Welcomed our new Under Secretary for Science and Technology, Dr. Dimitri Kusnezov. Prior to DHS, Dr. Kusnezov was a theoretical physicist working at the U.S. Department of Energy focusing on emerging technologies. He served in numerous positions, including the Deputy Under Secretary for Artificial Intelligence & Technology and Chief Scientist for the National Nuclear Security Administration.

Image
Electrical power lines with a blue sky in the background.
(Photo: Envato)

Created the Critical Infrastructure Security & Resilience Research (CISRR) Program to advance national policy that strengthens and maintains secure, functioning, and resilient critical infrastructure. CISRR will have five focus areas: (1) planning tools for conducting risk assessment ratings for special events; (2) electromagnetic pulse and geo-magnetic disturbance resilience capabilities; (3) positioning, navigation, and timing capabilities; (4) evaluation of “soft target” security for public safety, including countering improvised explosive device events; and (5) research supporting security testing capabilities relating to telecommunications equipment, industrial control systems, and open-source software.

Image
Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) leadership happily wields giant scissors, cutting through a blue ribbon at the opening of CSAC’s new Chemical Security Laboratory.
(Photo: S&T)

Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) opened a new experimental Chemical Security Laboratory in partnership with the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Chemical Biological Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland. The new laboratory will benefit CSAC’s risk and consequence models and contribute essential data to current S&T projects, such as chemical threat characterization and gas forming reactions, as well as emerging projects as the needs arise.

Image
we're looking forward to what the future holds.
(Image: S&T)

In 2023, we will continue to “do the science,” partner with other agencies to get real-world results, crowdsource innovation from the public sector and invite diverse perspectives, share information that contributes to our collective understanding of national security, and continuously strive for improvement as we carry out our vital national security mission. 

 

Last Updated: 12/15/2022
Was this page helpful?
This page was not helpful because the content