You are here

Series 2: Building Resilience and Innovation Equity

Series 2: Building Resilience and Innovation Equity

Virtual Whole-of-Government R&D ShowcaseWelcome to Series 2: Building Resilience and Innovation Equity—the second part of the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (S&T)’s four-part Whole-of-Government Virtual Research and Development (R&D) Showcase! 

As governments step-up research investments to accelerate pandemic recovery efforts, reduce risks, and enhance preparedness, there is an immediate need to focus on communities vulnerable to systemic shocks and persistent stressors, brought by natural and human-induced disasters. With an emphasis on community engagement, cross-disciplinary research, and advanced technologies, this series will address how the U.S. government is helping communities adapt to compounding pressures by delivering solutions related to climate, supply chains, crisis communications, and information sharing among front-line responders.
 

Expert Panel: Research Impacts to Address Chemical and Biological Threats Expert Panel 1: Research Impacts to Address Chemical and Biological Threats—Scenario-based risk analysis and research play a critical role in enhancing chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear defense and bolstering emergency response functions during natural or human-induced incidents. In the face of emerging threats, this conversation will highlight why research matters when seconds can mean the difference between a cascading event or an isolated and controlled event. Learn what it takes to ensure emergency responders and decision-makers have the right tools and resources when they are needed the most. Discover how a whole-of-government approach is providing federal, tribal, state, and local officials with timely guidance and technologies to save lives and keep communities thriving.

Expert Panel 2: Enhancing Community Resilience EquityExpert Panel 2: Enhancing Community Resilience Equity—As government organizations invest in science and research to get the country moving again, there is an urgency to better understand why some communities recover more quickly and effectively than others and what the government can do to balance the scales. Societal impacts such as readiness and adaptability, understanding risk, and having a trusted network to rely on can make or break a community during a human-induced or natural disaster, including a pandemic, flood, wildfire, or even a widespread power failure. Learn how U.S. government research organizations are leveraging new scientific ideas, materials, and approaches by working directly with community leaders to define problems, mobilize public-private actions, and deliver solutions in the areas of transportation, public health, emergency management, and green infrastructure.

Expert Panel 3: Building Infrastructure ResilienceExpert Panel 3: Building Infrastructure Resilience—Communities vulnerable to disasters and disruptions brought by the COVID-19 pandemic and the climate crisis are prompting governments to enhance infrastructure resilience across power, transportation, water, supply chain, food, and financial systems. To seize the moment and close inequality gaps, S&T is building cross-disciplinary research teams to holistically assess our critical infrastructure and lifeline services. Outcomes are producing new approaches, methods, and innovations for securing and improving vital sectors our society depends upon daily. Learn how science and technology advances in autonomy, predictive analytics, modeling and simulation, and mobility offer new solutions to tackle immediate challenges, ensuring no community is left behind.

Expert Panel 4: Securing our Future through Climate ResilienceExpert Panel 4: Securing our Future through Climate Resilience—Climate change is changing the way we think about and plan for securing the homeland – protecting our economy, health, infrastructure, and overall well-being of our citizens. Amidst a global pandemic, in 2020 alone, 22 climate disasters occurred, marking the sixth consecutive year that 10 or more billion-dollar weather and climate disasters have impacted our regional and national security. Threats to our housing, energy, agriculture, commerce, and emergency support functions make climate a top priority. S&T understands there is no one-size-fits-all approach to combating the climate crisis and is making real impacts to protect our communities and frontline workers.

 

ebook iconEBook

This companion document offers a glimpse of the exciting efforts discussed in our expert panel discussions. View the downloadable PDF to learn about vital S&T programs addressing chemical and biological emergency response, crisis management, capacity to withstand disasters, and climate resilience.

Related Stories

The resources listed offer additional information on various S&T research efforts related to chemical and biological emergency response, crisis management, capacity to withstand disasters, and climate resilience.

 

Meet Our Experts

2.1 Research Impacts to Address Chemical and Biological Threats

  • Rachel Gooding, Chief Scientist, Chemical Security Analysis Center, Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate
  • Sang Don Lee, Ph.D., Principal Associate National Program Director, Homeland Security Research Program, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • Kim Robinson, Communications and Partnership Engagements Chief, Department of Homeland Security Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction Office
  • Herbert Wolfe, Ph.D., Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health Security, Department of Homeland Security Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction Office

2.2 Enhancing Community Resilience Equity

  • David Alexander, Ph.D., Senior Scientist, Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate
  • Rhonda Binda, Deputy Borough President, Queens, New York City
  • David Corman, Ph.D., Program Director, Cyber-Physical Systems and Smart and Connected Communities, National Science Foundation
  • Erik Svendsen, Ph.D., Director, Division of Environmental Health Science and Practice, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Jeffrey Payne, Ph.D., Director, Office for Coastal Management, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
  • Andy Miller, Ph.D., Associate Director for Climate, Air, Climate, and Energy Research, National Research Program, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

2.3 Building Infrastructure Resilience

  • David Alexander, Ph.D., Senior Scientist, Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate
  • Richard Seline, Co-Founder, Resilience Innovation Hub and Collaboratory Network
  • Regan Murray, Ph.D., Division Director, Water Infrastructure, Office of Research & Development’s Center for Environmental Solutions and Emergency Response, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • Igor Linkov, Senior Scientific Technical Manager, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center
  • Hayes Jones, Resilience, Security, and Agency Engagement Lead, Federal Energy Management Program, Department of Energy

2.4 Securing our Future through Climate Resilience

  • David Alexander, Ph.D., Senior Scientist, Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate
  • Randy “Church” Kee, Maj Gen, USAF (Ret.) Executive Director, Arctic Domain Awareness Center, University of Alaska; Commissioner, U.S. Arctic Research Commission, University of Alaska
  • Scott Lindsey, Ph.D., Regional Director, National Weather Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
  • Kelsey Frazier, Graduate Student and Research Associate, Arctic Domain Awareness Center

 

Was this page helpful?

This page was not helpful because the content:
Back to Top